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Tex-Mex Chili Pie

(Family Features) - Man cannot live by meat alone. Surveys of eating habits suggest that men eat more meat and far fewer fruits and vegetables than women do. Men usually reach for comfort foods that are warm, hearty and satisfying.

Men should be eating better because a bigger waistline can hurt their heart health. Is it possible to eat healthy and still get the satisfaction of "man food"? The answer is yes.

Balancing Act

When it comes to making meat choices, there are two words to remember: moderation and lean.

Moderation: The American Heart Association recommends eating no more than six ounces of lean meat or fish each day. A three-ounce cooked portion of meat is about the size of a deck of cards. Here are some examples:

  • 1/2 of a skinless chicken breast or a chicken leg with thigh
  • 3/4 cup of flaked fish
  • Two slices of lean roast beef

Lean: There are 29 cuts of meat that qualify as "lean." The American Heart Association has a list of extra-lean meat choices certified to be low in saturated fat and cholesterol. If you look for the American Heart Association's heart-check mark on food packages, you'll find a growing list of deli meats, beef, chicken, bison, turkey, pork, seafood and more.

What to Eat

An overall heart-healthy eating plan is important. The American Heart Association has simple recommendations:

  • Eat a variety of foods from all food groups and choose vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products and fat-free or low-fat dairy products most often.
  • Eat less junk food, i.e., limit foods and drinks high in calories but low in nutrients, and limit saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium.
  • If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation. This means an average of one to two drinks per day for men.

To find heart-healthy foods in the grocery store, start by making your grocery list online. Visit heartcheckmark.org to build your list from more than 800 products ranging from meat and dairy to vegetables and snacks, all certified by the American Heart Association to be low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Print your list for future use, or access it from your Web-enabled mobile phone or PDA at mylist.heartcheckmark.org.

Men don't have to feel unsatisfied by eating healthy. Eating well can be satisfying and delicious, even for a guy.

For more information on eating heart healthy visit americanheart.org.

Tips for Eating at Steakhouses

Can you eat steak on a heart-healthy diet? You bet, as long as it's a reasonable portion of lean beef.

  • Don't order king-sized cuts. About three ounces of a thinly sliced cut is perfect, or choose a six-ounce steak and enjoy non-meat entrees the rest of the day.
  • Steakhouses generally prepare your food to order, so ask to have all visible fat trimmed before the meat is cooked.
  • Many steakhouses do a superb job with seafood - look for fish on the menu and ask your server about the catch of the day. Research shows that eating oily fish containing omega-3 fatty acids (e.g., salmon, trout and herring) may help lower your risk of death from coronary artery disease.

Instead of - Fatty cuts of meat, such as rib eye, porterhouse, T-bone
Try - Leaner cuts, such as London broil, filet mignon, round or flank steak, sirloin tip, tenderloin

Instead of - French fried, au gratin or scalloped potatoes
Try - Baked potato or rice, easy on the butter

Instead of - Caesar or marinated salad
Try - Green salad with dressing on the side

Instead of - Fried vegetables
Try - Steamed vegetables

Instead of - Pie and ice cream
Try - Angel food cake, sherbet or sorbet

Shop smart! Live well! Look for the heart-check mark!

All products bearing the heart-check mark meet the American Heart Association's nutrition criteria per standard serving size to be:

  • Low in fat (3 grams or less)
  • Low in saturated fat (1 gram or less)
  • Limited in trans fat (less than .5 grams)
  • Low in cholesterol (20 milligrams or less)
  • Moderate in sodium, with 480 milligrams or less for individual foods
  • Contain at least 10 percent of the Daily Value of one or more of these naturally occurring nutrients: protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, iron or dietary fiber.

Also:

  • Seafood, game meat, meat and poultry, as well as whole-grain products, main dishes and meals must meet additional nutritional requirements.

Tex-Mex Chili Pie

Description
Perfect for wintry nights or while watching sporting events, this hearty chili is accented with crisp corn tortillas, fat-free cheddar cheese and dollops of fat-free sour cream. This recipe is worth repeating, so save time now by making a double batch and storing the leftover chili in an airtight container for up to 6 months in the freezer.

Ingredients
Chili
  • 1 pound extra-lean ground beef
  • 1 15.5-ounce can no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 14.5-ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 8-ounce can no-salt-added tomato sauce
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 1/2 medium yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2 medium green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt-free all-purpose seasoning blend
Tortillas
  • Cooking spray
  • 4 6-inch corn tortillas
Toppings
  • 1/2 cup shredded fat-free cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup fat-free sour cream

Preparation
    1. In large nonstick skillet, cook beef over medium-high heat for 6 to 8 minutes, or until browned, stirring frequently to turn and break up. Using slotted spoon, transfer beef to 2- to 3-quart slow cooker. Add remaining chili ingredients to slow cooker, stirring to combine. Cook on high for 3 to 4 hours or on low for 7 to 9 hours, or until onions and bell peppers are tender and flavors have blended.
    2. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375°F. Lightly spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.
    3. Using sharp knife, cut each tortilla into 8 triangles. Place in single layer on baking sheet. Lightly spray tops with cooking spray.
    4. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, or until chips are golden brown and crisp. Transfer baking sheet to cooling rack. Let chips cool for 15 minutes.
    5. When chili is ready, place 8 tortilla chips with pointed end up around inside of each rimmed soup bowl. Ladle chili into bowls. Sprinkle cheddar over chili. Top each serving with dollop of sour cream.

Calories: 371g     Total Fat: 6.5g
Cholesterol: 67mg     Protein: 39g
Carbohydrates: 40g     Sodium: 317mg

Serves
Serves 4; 1 1/2 cups per serving

SOURCE: American Heart Association



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