Kids 06 February 2019

New Research Links Refrigerator Staple to Teenage Height

Study finds drinking more milk growing up is associated with increased height at 17

(Family Features) Drinking real dairy milk is especially important for growing kids, and new research suggests regularly drinking more milk throughout childhood is associated with an increase in teenage height, according to a new study in “The Journal of Nutrition.”1

Researchers followed more than 700 kids from the time they were born, analyzing their height and diet from ages 2-17, and found each additional glass of milk kids drank per day throughout childhood increased their height at age 17 by around 0.39 centimeters. That means the more milk kids drank regularly growing up, the taller they were. Water and other beverages, including 100 percent juice and sugar-sweetened beverages, didn’t have the same effect.

These findings add to a growing body of research that suggests regularly drinking milk during the growing years is associated with greater height in the teen years, while regularly skipping milk or drinking non-dairy milk alternatives, like almond or soy milk, is linked to shorter height.2, 3, 4

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend two cups of milk and milk products each day for kids ages 2-3, two and a half cups each day for kids 4-8 and three cups each day for kids 9-18. While it’s hard for kids to get nutrients they need to grow strong without milk in their diets, eighty-five percent of Americans fall short of these daily recommendations, which includes most children over 3 years old.5, 6

Serving an eight-ounce glass of milk alongside meals or snacks is an easy way to give kids nine essential nutrients, including high-quality protein, and get them closer to these recommendations. Try pairing these homemade cereal bars from Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, with a cold glass of milk for an easy after-school snack, and find more kid-approved recipes at pourmoremilk.com.
14489 detail image embed1

Homemade Cereal Bars

Recipe courtesy of Jamielyn Nye, author of iheartnaptime.net, on behalf of Milk Life

Servings: 16

  • 1/2       cup peanut butter
  • 1/2       cup honey
  • 1/2       teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 1/2    cups dry cereal
  1. Line 8-by-8-inch pan with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a medium size sauce pan, combine peanut butter and honey and cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla.
  3. Add in dry cereal and stir until completely coated then press into lined pan. Use piece of parchment paper to press firmly down on bars.
  4. Refrigerate bars 1 hour, or until ready to serve.
  5. Serve with eight-ounce glass of milk.

Nutritional information per serving: 180 calories; 4 1/2 g fat; 1 g saturated fat; 5 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 26 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 160 mg sodium; 306 mg calcium (30% of daily value). Nutrition figures include an eight-ounce glass of fat free milk. 
 


1Marshall TA, Curtis AM, Cavanaugh JE, Warren JJ, Levy SM. Higher longitudinal milk intakes are associated with increased height in a birth cohort followed for 17 years. The Journal of Nutrition. 2018;148(7):1144-1149.

2Wiley AS. Does milk make children grow? Releationships between milk consumption and height in NHANES 1999-2002. American Journal of Human Biology. 2005;17(4):425-441.

3Rockell JEP, Williams SM, Taylor RW, Grant AM, Jones IE, Goulding A. Two-year changes in bone and body composition in young children with a history of prolonged milk avoidance. Osteoporosis International. 2005;16(9):1016-1023.

4 Morency M, Birken CS, Lebovic G, Chen Y,  L’Abbé M, Lee GJ, Maguire JL and the TARGet Kids! Collaboration. Association between noncow milk beverage consumption and childhood height. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017;106(2):597-602.

5 Krebs-Smith SM, Guenther PM, Subar AF, Kirkpatrick SI, Dodd KW. Americans do not meet federal dietary recommendations. The Journal of Nutrition. 2010;140:1832-1838.

6 U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015. 8th Edition, 2015.

Source: MilkPEP

Breakfast & Brunch 17 January 2019

New Year, New Organic You

(Family Features) The New Year is a great time to reflect on your life and think about what you can do to become happier and healthier. There are many resolutions you can make, but one that can benefit you, your family, your community and the planet is eating more organic food. It can also be easier than you think.

To be USDA-Certified Organic, food must be grown without toxic synthetic pesticides and herbicides, genetically engineered ingredients (also called GMOs), antibiotics or artificial growth hormones.

“Simply put, organic is better for you and the environment. When you’re eating organic foods, you’re keeping harmful chemicals and GMOs out of your body and some studies have shown that organic farming produces more nutrient-dense crops,” said Arjan Stephens, executive vice president, sales and marketing at Nature’s Path. “Organic farming supports a healthier planet by not adding chemicals to the air, water and soil, as well as keeping them away from you and future generations.”

Going organic is simple; you can start small and feel good knowing that every time you choose organic it benefits you and the environment. Here are three ways to go organic this year:

  • Look Inside Your Pantry: Fresh fruits and vegetables may be the first thing that come to mind when you think about organic, but don’t forget about your pantry. Staples such as flour, sugar, vegetable oil, peanut butter and more can be swapped out for organic options and make it easier to have organic food as part of every meal.
  • Start with What You Eat Everyday: A good place to start is with the foods you consume every day. If you and your family start each morning with a bowl of cereal, try eating organic cereal like Nature's Path, which has an extensive line of cereals (as well as waffles, granola, oatmeal and granola bars) that are all USDA-Certified Organic, or try this tasty, organic recipe for an Oatmeal Latte.
  • Think Outside the Cart: You may think that organic food costs more, but you can find less expensive options by shopping at your local farmer’s market, comparing prices online, buying in bulk (which is better for the environment) and even growing some of your own food.

Going organic can be easy, delicious and good for you and the planet. For more tips on going organic, visit blog.naturespath.com/.
13587 detail image embed1

Oatmeal Latte

  • 2/3       cup water
  • 1/3       cup vanilla soy milk
  • 1/2       cup Nature’s Path Original Hot Oatmeal
  • pinch of salt
  • 2          tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1-2       shots espresso, for topping
  • 1/2       cup warm vanilla soy milk, for topping
  • Nature’s Path Flax Plus Vanilla Almond Granola, for topping
  • pinch of cinnamon, for topping
  1. In small saucepan, bring water and soy milk to simmer over medium-high heat.
  2. Add oats and salt. Turn heat to medium and cook until oatmeal reaches desired consistency. Stir in brown sugar and transfer to bowl or mug.
  3. Using steamer, milk frother or whisk, froth warm milk until foamy.
  4. Top oatmeal with espresso and frothed milk. Stir gently. Top with granola and cinnamon.

Source: Nature’s Path

About Us

We love cooking, eating, and connecting with people from around the world.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.